UXify 2018 – How to Design Complex Stuff You Don’t Entirely Understand

Jim Ross / Tuesday, April 03, 2018

What do you do when you’re asked to design something very complex, in a domain that you know nothing about? How can you get up to speed quickly, in order to make the right design decisions? At UXify 2018, Rick Winslow, Head of Digital Innovation at Capital One Commercial Banking, will provide advice on “How to Design Complex Stuff You Don’t Entirely Understand.” 

UXify 2018: The Future of User Experience, our sixth annual, free UX conference, takes place on Friday, April 27 from 11 am – 5:30 pm, with networking from 5:30 - 7:00 pm. Lunch, snacks, and beer and wine during the networking are included.

Check out the UXify 2018 agenda and speaker list, and register for FREE.

How to Design Complex Stuff You Don’t Entirely Understand
By Rick Winslow, Head of Digital Innovation at Capital One Commercial Banking

Have you ever been asked to design something you can’t even begin to get your head around? Or to design something for expert users who speak a language of their own? Are the standard-issue tools of UX design, like personas, journey maps, and usability testing just not working? Do you find it impossible to explain to your parents and friends what you do?

Many industries — like finance, healthcare, and telecommunications — operate on complex and idiosyncratic systems. And the people who use those systems are often highly specialized experts. As demand for design spreads throughout these industries, designers are more and more likely to work on complex systems used by specialized experts. 

If you face these challenges, take heart! You are not alone. Learn some useful, practical coping strategies that can help you “fake it till you make it”.

Rick Winslow
Rick Winslow leads the digital innovation team for Capital One’s Commercial Banking business. He has spent about 20 years designing weird, obscure and complex software for both startups and large enterprises. He is a vocal proponent of agile, lean, human-centered-design, cross-functional collaboration and data science. He holds a BA from Columbia University and an MBA from Rutgers Business School. He also teaches in the Columbia University Applied Analytics program.

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